February 05, 2021 4 min read

We show you how to tie a Plug Frances 2 ways and recycling old guitar strings for some striking looks shrimp eyes! The original plug Frances comes Future Flys very own Marc Skovby.

The purpose of the design was to recreate a Frances pattern that would sink immediately and get down to the fish sitting on the far to middle bank, especially slim and deep channelled rivers in Denmark and chalk streams like the Hampshire Avon.

Tied By Jay Bartlett
Materials from Future
Fly

PATTERN 1:
1.8mm Red plastic liner tube
Gel Spun Tying Thread
Orange Signature Dubbing
Ginger American Opossum
Red Boar Bristles
Orange Signature Dubbing
5mm Matt Metallic Orange Tungsten Bead
4mm Matt Metallic Orange Tungsten Bead
Burnt Orange Rooster Saddle Hackle
4mm Metallic Orange Brass Hybrid Cone

Step 1
burn a burred edge at the end of a 1.8mm plastic liner tube, whilst still hot press hard on a flat surface to spread the melted plastic a little wider for a more secure butt. Slide onto the needle and start the fly with some gel spun tying thread at the burred edge.



Step 2
Add a small dubbing ball using some Too Cool signature dubbing then move your thread to the front of the dubbing ball.



Step 3
Take a a fairly bushy clump of American Opossum pelt in ginger and tie down in front of the dubbing ball, making sure that the hair spreads evenly all around the tubing and work your thread back as tight to the dubbing ball as possible to flare it out. Then slowly and carefully trim away the excess hair with a scalpel. 



Step 4
Next tie in 4 red boar bristles evenly spaced around the tubing and tail, when tightly secured bend the bristles out slightly so they flare out more and will be more resistant to water flow, which should equal more vibration.



Step 5
Taking some more of the too cool signature dubbing create a larger dubbing ball to cover the head of the hair and bristles, then position the thread in front on the liner tube, finally brush out the dubbing then brush backwards to blend with the hair.



Step 6
Then add some super glue to the liner tube and secure a 5mm tungsten bead in metallic orange tight into the dubbing ball, followed by a little more super glue and a 4mm tungsten bead in metallic orange again, pushing back hard to set the glue. Cut off the tying thread and then re tie it in front of the tungsten beads.



Step 7
Next take a rooster saddle hackle with the fibres measuring from the front of the beads to dubbing ball, then add 3-5 turns tight to the beads. 



Step 8
Then add a little super glue to the tubing and slide on a 4mm brass hybrid cone in metallic orange to finish the fly. 



Step 9
Remove the fly from the vise and trim away the excess tubing to 2-4mm from the cone, then melt the tubing down to the cone, whilst still hot press hard onto a flat surface to neaten the plastic and make it even more secure.



Step 10
Just add water!


PATTERN 2:
1.8mm Red plastic liner tube
6mm Metallic Orange Brass UFO Disc
Gel Spun Tying Thread
Ginger American Opossum
Used Guitar string wound ball ends from the D string (D'addario)
Red / Black Barred rubber legs
Orange Signature Dubbing
5mm Matt Metallic Orange Tungsten Bead
4mm Matt Metallic Orange Tungsten Bead
Burnt Orange Rooster Saddle Hackle
4mm Metallic Orange Brass Hybrid Cone

Step 1
burn a burred edge at the end of a 1.8mm plastic liner tube, whilst still hot press hard on a flat surface to spread the melted plastic a little wider for a more secure butt. Slide onto the needle then add a 6mm ufo disc in metallic orange and push back onto the burred edge and start the fly with some gel spun tying thread in front.



Step 2
Take a a fairly bushy clump of American Opossum pelt in ginger and tie down in front of the dubbing ball, making sure that the hair spreads evenly all around the tubing and work your thread back as tight to the dubbing ball as possible to flare it out. Then slowly and carefully trim away the excess hair with a scalpel. 



Step 3
Next trim the used guitar strings back to their wound ball ends, make a 45 degree bend in the string with the ball end facing flat inline with the bend, then tie the flat part of the string down on top of the head of the tied in fur. Try to make the strings no longer than this head, otherwise the next part maybe difficult.



Step 4
Next tie in 2 red barred rubber legs either side of the fly and make sure to tie in halfway so that you can double them back and make 4 legs overall, you can make the fold as long as the fur head as well like the strings as it will all be hidden by some dubbing. Space them apart a little bit and trim the top 2 legs a little shorter than the bottom 2 legs.



Step 5
Taking some more of the too cool signature dubbing create a large dubbing ball to cover the head of the hair strings and rubber legs, then position the thread in front on the liner tube, finally brush out the dubbing then brush backwards to blend with the hair.



Step 6
Then add some super glue to the liner tube and secure a 5mm tungsten bead in metallic orange tight into the dubbing ball, followed by a little more super glue and a 4mm tungsten bead in metallic orange again, pushing back hard to set the glue. Cut off the tying thread and then re tie it in front of the tungsten beads.



Step 7
Next take a rooster saddle hackle with the fibres measuring from the front of the beads to dubbing ball, then add 3-5 turns tight to the beads. 



Step 8
Then add a little super glue to the tubing and slide on a 4mm brass hybrid cone in metallic orange to finish the fly. 



Step 9
Remove the fly from the vise and trim away the excess tubing to 2-4mm from the cone, then melt the tubing down to the cone, whilst still hot press hard onto a flat surface to neaten the plastic and make it even more secure.



Step 10
Just add water!



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